Heartbleed Bug - Change passwords TODAY to google, yahoo and many other online services!

Update 4/11: There's a great post over on qz.com with an update on which sites were affected (with before/after lists) and what action should be taken. Key is to not bother updating passwords until the site has been fixed. Link: http://qz.com/197258/t/60189

I just finished changing alot of passwords. <phew>

Please take some time TODAY to read this brief post and change passwords for services that were affected by the Heartbleed Bug but have been fixed already. 

Using Storify to contribute to eNigeria Conference from afar

The #eNigeria2013 Conference is in full swing in Abuja, and I am contributing to the event from afar using Storify - see below for all the details or click here to view the eNigeria Conference story directly on Storify website. It's a distant second from being there in person as I was last year, but still I am happy to be a part of it in my small way.

Storify is a handy online tool that lets you create and develop narrative out of online content. It has powerful search tools to find content on twitter, google and other common sources and then include them using a drag and drop interface. I like it for making sense of the flood of information from a time-limited event that multiple people are posting updates about. 

Africa Roundtable: What is the Appropriate Combination of Financing and Human Capital Training for Sustainable Development?

Update:

Thanks everyone who joined us for the Africa Roundtable! The discussion with Nathan was very interesting, and the recording is well worth listening to (about an hour) and can be downloaded from https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/1436887230943837954 

The Africa Roundtable is back on 15 January, 2014 with an invitation to join a discussion on an interesting and timely question facing African civil society today, proposed by Nathaniel Houghton of the Congo Leadership Initiative: 

"The question development in Africa frequently becomes an argument about whether or how much aid should be given to developing communities and in what cases markets may be a useful development mechanism. This debate simplified is a question over whether the primary or first problem facing underdeveloped countries and communities is a lack of resources or a lack of capacity. Ultimately, both of these factors are necessary to promote sustainable change, but the correct "mix" is a serious topic for debate." 

How to Join the Discussion 

Click here to register and we will send you instructions and a link for joining the online event using your web browser. The event is free for all but we do request that you register in advance and consider making an optional $10 donation to Kabissa which helps to cover our costs. 

The event is scheduled for 15 January, 2014 at 15:00 UTC (6pm Nairobi, 4pm Abuja, 4pm Berlin, 3pm London, 10am Washington DC, 7am Seattle)

Introducing Nathaniel Houghton 

Portrait of Nathaniel Houghton

Nathaniel is the President and Founder of the Congo Leadership Initiative. From the CLI website stories page:

Nate used to think that he didn’t have a very good CLI story. That’s because he can’t point to one moment in Congo that changed his life, made him renounce every idea he had about the world, and led him to start a nonprofit in Africa. He’s not from Congo and the first time he visited Kinshasa, he was nineteen. But at this point, it’s safe to say that Congo’s history, people, and future are as big a part of his life as his own family and friends in the United States.

Nate believes that, “The best way to make the world a better place is to find something you love doing and figure out how to positively impact other people’s lives through your talents and interests. I think startups are cool, and that’s what CLI is. I believe in our product - leadership - and its power to change the world. I am inspired by the countless volunteers, in Congo and around the world, who make CLI possible.” Nate is thrilled with how much CLI has grown and even more excited for the future.

 
Nate believes that, “The best way to make the world a better place is to find something you love doing and figure out how to positively impact other people’s lives through your talents and interests. I think startups are cool, and that’s what CLI is. I believe in our product - leadership - and its power to change the world. I am inspired by the countless volunteers, in Congo and around the world, who make CLI possible.” Nate is thrilled with how much CLI has grown and even more excited for the future.
 
Nate believes that, “The best way to make the world a better place is to find something you love doing and figure out how to positively impact other people’s lives through your talents and interests. I think startups are cool, and that’s what CLI is. I believe in our product - leadership - and its power to change the world. I am inspired by the countless volunteers, in Congo and around the world, who make CLI possible.” Nate is thrilled with how much CLI has grown and even more excited for the future.
 
 
Nate believes that, “The best way to make the world a better place is to find something you love doing and figure out how to positively impact other people’s lives through your talents and interests. I think startups are cool, and that’s what CLI is. I believe in our product - leadership - and its power to change the world. I am inspired by the countless volunteers, in Congo and around the world, who make CLI possible.” Nate is thrilled with how much CLI has grown and even more excited for the future. - See more at: http://congoleaders.org/stories.html#S4

About the Congo Leadership Initiative

Congo Leadership Initiative empowers young people in Congo by preparing them to be leaders because the ultimate solutions to Congo's problems will come from the Congolese people. 

About the Africa Roundtable

The Africa Roundtable is an initiative of Kabissa to organize events to bring together people with a mutual interest in Africa for networking and to learn from featured speakers. Roundtable events connect people via video conference, and are recorded and put online for later viewing.

If you are interested in being featured at a future event please contact roundtable@kabissa.org. Details about upcoming events and an archive of past roundtable events are on our website at http://www.kabissa.org/africaroundtable

The Internet and Human Rights

I am and always have been an advocate of Internet as an important empowerment tool for civil society organizations worldwide working to improve the lives of people in their communities. The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights is also an important tool we can use to claim and defend our rights. Sometimes the connection gets lost, and indeed it seems that, increasingly, the Internet is being used more as a tool to oppress us rather than to empower us. 

So for this year's Blog Action Day on Human Rights I would like to draw your attention to The Internet and Human Rights, the infographic below published by APC.ORG under a creative commons license, which clearly outlines the articles in the declaration of human rights that related to how we use the Internet. These freedoms are important and we need to understand them in order to defend them. To this end, APC has developed Internet Rights Are Human Rights, an excellent series of training curricula that you can download and use to teach yourself or use to run workshops  on the topic. 

The Internet and Human Rights

Blog Action Day is just 5 days away. Register your blog today.

I received this important reminder and tips by email today from the Blog Action Day team. All Kabissa members are strongly encouraged to participate! Click here for info specific for Kabissa members blogging about human rights in Africa.

Latest news from Blog Action Day
 

Dear Tobias,

It’s hard to believe that Blog Action Day has come around again so quickly. Our team of volunteers are working hard to make sure that this year’s Blog Action Day will be awesome. 

As previous Blog Action Day participants, we don’t want you to miss on being part of Blog Action Day. Mark October 16 in your calendar now and set yourself a reminder to get your post ready.

Make sure you register your blog today, so we can include it in our participants list and help connect you with thousands of other bloggers around the world.  

Not sure what to cover in your Blog Action Day post?

This year the Blog Action Day theme is Human Rights.

We know that some bloggers might find developing a post about Human Rights a bit tricky, especially if you don’t normally cover it in your regular posts. It may even be what has been putting your off from registering your blog to take part in Blog Action Day. 

To make it  a little bit easier, here are some ideas to help you develop your blog post. 

  • If you’re short on time, work together with other bloggers to produce content together
  • Ask your blog and social media followers what they would like to know about Human Rights and focus your post on trying to answer their questions. 

To make sure you make the most out of Blog Action Day we have take a look at our blog post on the Top 5 tips on how to make the most out of being involved in Blog Action Day

We are looking forward to see what you have to say about Human Rights on October 16so don’t forget to register and get your post ready.  

All the best

Karina and the rest of the Blog Action Day Team.

P.S. Tell your friends to take part in Blog Action Day  with you and register their blogs by going to our website in English Spanish or Portuguese


  

Follow Blog Action Day on Social Media

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5 tips to make the most out of taking part in Blog Action Day

Blog Action Day 2013

October brings Blog Action Day, which this year will focus the world's attention on the important topic of human rights. This is an ideal opportunity for Kabissa members working in Africa on human rights to tell your stories and showcase your successes and challenges in defending them in your communities. Click here for details on how to participate, and email us with your ideas. 

5 tips to make the most out of taking part in Blog Action Day

(source: Karina Brisby post on Blog Action Day website

Blog Action Day 2013 is almost here. Below are some top tips we have learnt over the years to make the most out of your involvement.  If you have additional tips add them in the comments section of Karina's post.

1. Blog Action Day Don’t forget to take part.

Put a reminder in your calendar for October 16, 2013 to make your blog post live on Blog Action Day.

Every year lots of people forget to add their post, so put a reminder in your calendar now and set your alarm or reminder to alert you to take part in Blog Action Day.

In addition, you may want to join our Facebook or Google+ events for October 16 as an extra reminder.

2. Prepare you Blog Action Day post in advance.

We are all very busy people, but if you leave your Blog Action Day post until the last moment, you may run out of time.

By having your post ready a couple of days before October 16, you give yourself lots of time to follow the live coverage or  look at other participants posts. Most importantly you get your post done.

3. Make your post easy to find. Tag your post.

Most Blog Action Day participants use WordPress, Blogger or Tumblr to host their blogs. These systems like nearly all other blogging systems have a section called Tags or Labels which allows you to attach keywords to your post that help search engines find your content more easily.

We suggest that you add the following tags #BAD13#OCT16#Humanrights#BlogActionDay alongside any other terms that would describe your post content in these sections

If you are unsure how to use tags or labels, here is a great explanation of how to use them and from the parenting blog network MumsNet.

4. Promote your post.

When you have posted your Blog Action Day to your blog on October 16, make sure your tell your friends and the Blog Action Day Team about it.

If you use social media networks like TwitterFacebookOrkut or Google+, tell the people in your network that you have taken part in Blog Action Day and that you would like them to read and comment on your blog.

Here is a suggested status update you could use.

“I’ve just posted my #BlogActionDay post on #HumanRights on [yourwebsitelink] take a look & leave a comment #BAD13″

The Blog Action Day team will be able to search for most blogs and related content, but to make sure we don’t miss yours, tweet us at @blogactionday or via our live coverage widget that will be on the front page of our website.

5.  Read other Blog Action Day posts and take part in the discussion.

One of the best things about Blog Action Day is that you make connections with amazing blogs that you might not usually come across.

Follow the live coverage on October 16, on blogactionday.org and our social media profiles to find out about other participant posts. If you like someone’s Blog Action Day post why not leave a comment and share it via social networks.

Blog Action Day 2013: Human Rights

Blog Action Day 2013: Human Rights

October 16th is Blog Action Day, the one day of the year where thousands of bloggers can work together to focus on one important global topic, and help raise awareness and money for charities and social causes. 2013 is the fourth year running that Kabissa has participated as a Blog Action Day network partner. This year's theme HUMAN RIGHTS is very relevant to Africa and the communities served by Kabissa members. 

As in years past, we enthusiastically encourage everyone blogging from and about Africa, on Kabissa and on your own blogs and websites, to join in and be a part of Blog Action Day. We will do our best to help spread the word about the issues and causes you write about via the Kabissa blog and social networks. 

Read on to learn how Blog Action Day works, prepare for blogging on Kabissa, and get information about this year's HUMAN RIGHTS theme. 

Rallying Support to Educate Girls in Africa: An Urgent Request from Aid for Africa (deadline 5 June at noon PST)

CatherineAid for Africa is an alliance of small U.S.-registered nonprofits working on the ground in Sub Saharan Africa. All of our members are working to make a difference in the lives of children, families, and communities through grassroots programs focused on health, education, economic development, arts & culture, conservation, and wildlife protection in Africa.

We have a special commitment to girls education. Through the Aid for Africa Girls Education Fund we support scholarships for girls who are selected by our members in primary, secondary, high school and college. Education changes everything. Catherine Koyiah is a young Maasia women who attends the University of Nairobi with funding from the Aid for Africa Girls Education Fund. She was able to avoid early marriage and a life of poverty because she received support to attend school. You may find her story here: http://www.aidforafrica.org/?p=9369. We also support girls in primary and high school.

The Aid for Africa Girls Education Fund is one of five organizations in the running to win $5,000 through 5forFairness.org. To be eligible to vote you must join the 5 for Fairness winner's circle. You can join for free (normally a $5 contribution) by liking Applegate's Facebook page here: http://www.applegate.com/5forfairness. Applegate has generously agreed to pay for 1,000 of its fans to join the 5 For Fairness Winner's Circle and is funding the grant. You may also join by going to 5forfairness.org and donating $5.

A simple vote will translate into $5000, and every penny of the money will educate girls. Aid for Africa takes no fees on donations to the Fund and our members who chose the girls—there are 14 organizations involved—don’t use any of the money they receive from us for overhead. Your vote= direct action.

Aid for Africa is proud of the alliance it has built and our strength through partnership. Join us by voting for the Aid for Africa Girls Education Fund so we can send more Catherines to school and change lives. 

Invitation: The National Endowment for Democracy hosting discussion on "Implications of the Kenyan Elections" with Maina Kiai

I received this invitation by email today and wanted to pass it on for the benefit of Kabissa members who are, like me, concerned about what is next for one of my favorite countries. I am told the event will be recorded for viewing online after the event. When I get the link I will update this post on Kabissa. 

The National Endowment for Democracy and the World Movement for Democracy cordially invite you to attend a discussion on “Implications of the Kenyan Elections” on Tuesday, April 23 from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. at the National Endowment for Democracy (1025 F Street NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20004). The discussion will feature Maina Kiai, Executive Director of InformAction and the UN Special Rapporteur on Rights to Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and Association. Joel Barkan, Senior Associate of the CSIS Africa Program, will moderate.

RSVP Here: http://kenyanelections.eventbrite.com/

Update! The live-stream and video has been posted directly on the event’s page on the NED website: http://www.ned.org/events/implications-of-the-kenyan-elections


Video streaming by Ustream

 

Update from Tariq Khokar on Open Data news from the World Bank

Tariq, who must have one of the coolest job titles at the World Bank (he's their official Open Data Evangelist), posted the following remarkable update to Facebook today. I am impressed, and recommend all four links to Kabissa members seeking to understand and use World Bank Open Data relevant to Africa and the whole world. If you contact their helpdesk and get interesting answers, let us know about them here!  

On the plane back to DC from SFO and feeling very proud of my World Bank Data colleagues who are launching a number of superb products today, if you'll indulge me, my top 4:

1) The 2013 World Development Indicators (WDI):http://wdi.worldbank.org/ now in an "online first' form with a streamlined print edition to wet your appetite / slam down on a desk with the conviction that comes from being informed by most trusted facts on global development. 

2) The WDI Data Finder Mobile Apps: http://bit.ly/WDI-DataFinder - a suite of cross-platform, multi-lingual products that get better with every iteration making it easy to access data wherever you are and if you're brave, still slam down on a desk with conviction.

3) The New World Bank Open Data Catalog: http://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ - this is really the backbone of the Bank's Open Data Initiative - over a hundred databases from across the institution that cover dozens of topics and geographies, now searchable and all available free for anyone to use and re-use.

4) The New Work Bank Data Helpdesk: https://datahelpdesk.worldbank.org/ - our team answers over 500 queries a month from users wanting to know more about our data or get help using it. This new knowledge base and discussion space make it easier for people to find answers and share their ideas. 

And if that weren't enough, our friends from the World Bank Group Finances Open Data team just announced they've opened a bunch of data from the International Finance Corporation (IFC): https://finances.worldbank.org/

Hope you enjoy them. I'm going to spend the rest of this flight editing some videos... but more on that next week.

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